Get PDF Made at Home: Curing & Smoking: From Dry Curing to Air Curing and Hot Smoking, to Cold Smoking

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Place the bag of meat in the refrigerator for six to seven days. Some liquid will be drawn from the meat after a few hours. This liquid will act as a brine for the meat.


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Turn the bag two or more times a day in the refrigerator to redistribute the liquid. Remove the meat from the bag.

Curing and Smoking Meats for Home Food Preservation

Discard bag and brine. Wash meat in running cold water and pat dry. Place on a cake rack which is placed over a cookie sheet if possible and let it air dry in the refrigerator for 24 hours. Prepare your smoker. Start your charcoal fire in the bottom of the smoker an hour before you want to smoke the meat. Soak 2 cups or so of wood chips preferably alder for this project in some water. Place the grill about a foot above that. Place the meat on the grill, cover, and smoke 2 to 3 hours until the internal temperature is degrees F.

Add more wet chips, as needed, to keep the smoke up. This bacon can now be eaten directly, fried like breakfast bacon or used in many recipes. Cut the bacon into 4- to 8-ounce pieces, wrap well, and freeze for future cooking adventures.

The book has several other recipes for German sausages which are well worth making as well as more information on salting and smoking. It is smoked over alder or fir, it is less sweet than most breakfast bacon and it is not watery. During a cold smoke, the product is placed in an unheated chamber which is then filled with smoke.

How to Cure Bacon at Home

The most commonly used methods are a dry cure or brining liquid At Browne, we apply our cure by hand in a dry rub:. The salt of the cure draws out the moisture within the fish. This firms the texture and imparts a deeper flavor. Once the cure has been applied, the fillets are placed on racks to cure for a minimum of 21 hours in refrigeration. At Browne, in our professional smoker, or kiln, we keep ours at an optimal 78 degrees F.

From Dry Curing to Air Curing and Hot Smoking, to Cold Smoking

While smoking periods vary, generally we keep it to around 6 hours per batch. Key to the process is the type of wood used actually chips, which are more of the consistency of sawdust — allowed to smolder slowly, so the aromatics of the wood oils are released. At Browne, our smoker produces only about fillets per batch, making it a true artisanal production.

Once the fillets have gone through the smoking processes, they are cooled on racks for over 40 hours. When ready for slicing, the skin is removed, and each fillet is hand-fed through our custom slicer.

From there, the slices are portioned, placed on our custom packaging, and then individually cryovaced, labeled, and ready for sale or shipment. The tenderloin is succulent and moreishly flavoursome; the chicken — which now has a conker-like glossy coat — is a revelation, with a fragrant, toasty twist. His own teacher always held something back. Start with dry curing allowing salt to do what it does naturally; it requires little kit , hot and cold smoking and air-drying before progressing to more complicated techniques.

Woodchips burn evenly and produce a consistent flow of smoke.

Makin' Bacon - a Guide to Cold Smoking Bacon

Use only hard woods ash, oak, maple, beech ; softwoods release harmful toxic resins. Add hay, pine needles, rosemary, bay, lavender, nettles or juniper for a more aromatic smoke. My best home-made one was an old enamelled bread bin. Your wood chips go on top of this, with a smouldering coal or two, to create smoke.

A few leaky spots, even a little chimney, will help. A colander placed where the tubing enters the smoke chamber at the bottom dissipates the smoke, stopping it from becoming a plume.

Keep the temperature in the chamber as cool as possible without letting the fire go out. Do this by adjusting the air flow, covering or uncovering air holes in the firebox or the chimney in the smoke chamber. Remember: while hot smoking cooks, cold smoking is about preserving and flavouring only — the food still needs cooking. Hot-smoked chicken or pheasant breasts recipe. Hot-smoked mackerel recipe. Pine-smoked merguez sausages recipe.

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